Understanding slow motion, frames per second and percentage of playback speed

Understanding slow motion, frames per second and percentage of playback speed

I recently read someone online asking how to convert between overcranked Frames Per Second for slow motion and getting the percentage of reduced speed in their final NLE. This is a pretty simple equation, but one than can be confusing to those just starting to understand how your capture frame rate equates to your final project frame rate. Here are the factors that you have to consider: The frame rate that your camera’s sensor was set to output The frame rate of your video stream that is being recorded in the camera (can be different than sensor output!) The frame rate of your final NLE sequence or timeline You will set your camera to record in a high speed frame rate (generally considered 48fps and above) in order to record slow motion footage in the field. Some cameras will also allow you to choose a separate frame rate for the video stream that’s actually being recorded (when the camera’s frame rate is faster than the recorded stream’s frame rate, it’s called “overcranking” or in-camera slow motion, the opposite is called “undercranking” or in-camera timelapse). Overcranking will result in a slow motion file that will already match the frame rate of your final project (usually 24p, 25p or 30p). When you use overcranking, you will end up with a clip that already plays back in slow motion, and the percentage of slow motion will depend on your camera’s frame rate and the frame rate of the video stream. For example, if your camera was set to 60fps, and recorded that into a 24p stream, that would result in footage that...